Growth diagrams and dual graded graphs

AUTHORS:

  • Martin Rubey (2016-09): Initial version
  • Martin Rubey (2017-09): generalize, more rules, improve documentation
  • Travis Scrimshaw (2017-09): switch to rule-based framework

Todo

  • provide examples for the P and Q-symbol in the skew case
  • implement a method providing a visualization of the growth diagram with all labels, perhaps as LaTeX code
  • when shape is given, check that it is compatible with filling or labels
  • optimize rules, mainly for RuleRSK and RuleBurge
  • implement backward rules for GrowthDiagramDomino
  • implement backward rule from [LLMSSZ2013], [LS2007]
  • make semistandard extension generic
  • accommodate dual filtered graphs

A guided tour

Growth diagrams, invented by Sergey Fomin [Fom1994], [Fom1995], provide a vast generalization of the Robinson-Schensted-Knuth (RSK) correspondence between matrices with non-negative integer entries and pairs of semistandard Young tableaux of the same shape.

The main fact is that many correspondences similar to RSK can be defined by providing a pair of so-called local rules: a ‘forward’ rule, whose input are three vertices \(y\), \(t\) and \(x\) of a certain directed graph (in the case of Robinson-Schensted: the directed graph corresponding to Young’s lattice) and an integer (in the case of Robinson-Schensted: \(0\) or \(1\)), and whose output is a fourth vertex \(z\). This rule should be invertible in the following sense: there is a so-called ‘backward’ rule that recovers the integer and \(t\) given \(y\), \(z\) and \(x\).

As an example, the growth rules for the classical RSK correspondence are provided by RuleRSK. To produce a growth diagram, pass the desired rule and a permutation to GrowthDiagram:

sage: RuleRSK = GrowthDiagram.rules.RSK()
sage: w = [2,3,6,1,4,5]; G = GrowthDiagram(RuleRSK, w); G
0  0  0  1  0  0
1  0  0  0  0  0
0  1  0  0  0  0
0  0  0  0  1  0
0  0  0  0  0  1
0  0  1  0  0  0

The forward rule just mentioned assigns 49 partitions to the corners of each of the 36 cells of this matrix (i.e., 49 the vertices of a \((6+1) \times (6+1)\) grid graph), with the exception of the corners on the left and top boundary, which are initialized with the empty partition. More precisely, for each cell, the forward_rule() computes the partition \(z\) labelling the lower right corner, given the content \(c\) of a cell and the other three partitions:

t --- x
|  c  |
y --- z

Warning

Note that a growth diagram is printed with matrix coordinates, the origin being in the top-left corner. Therefore, the growth is from the top left to the bottom right!

The partitions along the boundary opposite of the origin, reading from the bottom left to the top right, are obtained by using the method out_labels():

sage: G.out_labels()
[[],
 [1],
 [2],
 [3],
 [3, 1],
 [3, 2],
 [4, 2],
 [4, 1],
 [3, 1],
 [2, 1],
 [1, 1],
 [1],
 []]

However, in the case of a rectangular filling, it is more practical to split this sequence of labels in two. Interpreting the sequence of partitions along the right boundary as a standard Young tableau, we then obtain the so-called P_symbol(), the partitions along the bottom boundary yield the so-called Q_symbol(). These coincide with the output of the classical RSK() insertion algorithm:

sage: ascii_art([G.P_symbol(), G.Q_symbol()])
[   1  3  4  5    1  2  3  6 ]
[   2  6      ,   4  5       ]
sage: ascii_art(RSK(w))
[   1  3  4  5    1  2  3  6 ]
[   2  6      ,   4  5       ]

The filling can be recovered knowing the partitions labelling the corners of the bottom and the right boundary alone, by repeatedly applying the backward_rule(). Therefore, to initialize a GrowthDiagram, we can provide these labels instead of the filling:

sage: GrowthDiagram(RuleRSK, labels=G.out_labels())
0  0  0  1  0  0
1  0  0  0  0  0
0  1  0  0  0  0
0  0  0  0  1  0
0  0  0  0  0  1
0  0  1  0  0  0

Invocation

In general, growth diagrams are defined for \(0-1\)-fillings of arbitrary skew shapes. In the case of the Robinson-Schensted-Knuth correspondence, even arbitrary non-negative integers are allowed. In other cases, entries may be either zero or an \(r\)-th root of unity - for example, RuleDomino insertion is defined for signed permutations, that is, \(r=2\). Traditionally, words and permutations are also used to specify a filling in special cases.

To accommodate all this, the filling may be passed in various ways. The most general possibility is to pass a dictionary of coordinates to (signed) entries, where zeros can be omitted. In this case, when the parameter shape is not explicitly specified, it is assumed to be the minimal rectangle containing the origin and all coordinates with non-zero entries.

For example, consider the following generalized permutation:

1 2 2 2 4 4
4 2 3 3 2 3

that we encode as the dictionary:

sage: P = {(1-1,4-1): 1, (2-1,2-1): 1, (2-1,3-1): 2, (4-1,2-1): 1, (4-1,3-1): 1}

Note that we are subtracting \(1\) from all entries because of zero-based indexing, we obtain:

sage: GrowthDiagram(RuleRSK, P)
0  0  0  0
0  1  0  1
0  2  0  1
1  0  0  0

Alternatively, we could create the same growth diagram using a matrix.

Let us also mention that one can pass the arguments specifying a growth diagram directly to the rule:

sage: RuleRSK(P)
0  0  0  0
0  1  0  1
0  2  0  1
1  0  0  0

In contrast to the classical insertion algorithms, growth diagrams immediately generalize to fillings whose shape is an arbitrary skew partition:

sage: GrowthDiagram(RuleRSK, [3,1,2], shape=SkewPartition([[3,3,2],[1,1]]))
.  1  0
.  0  1
1  0

As an important example, consider the Stanley-Sundaram correspondence between oscillating tableaux and (partial) perfect matchings. Perfect matchings of \(\{1, \ldots, 2r\}\) are in bijection with \(0-1\)-fillings of a triangular shape with \(2r-1\) rows, such that for each \(k\) there is either exactly one non-zero entry in row \(k\) or exactly one non-zero entry in column \(2r-k\). Explicitly, if \((i,j)\) is a pair in the perfect matching, the entry in column \(i-1\) and row \(2r-j\) equals \(1\). For example:

sage: m = [[1,5],[3,4],[2,7],[6,8]]
sage: G = RuleRSK({(i-1, 8-j): 1 for i,j in m}, shape=[7,6,5,4,3,2,1]); G
0  0  0  0  0  1  0
0  1  0  0  0  0
0  0  0  0  0
1  0  0  0
0  0  1
0  0
0

The partitions labelling the bottom-right corners along the boundary opposite of the origin then form a so-called oscillating tableau - the remaining partitions along the bottom-right boundary are redundant:

sage: G.out_labels()[1::2]
[[1], [1, 1], [2, 1], [1, 1], [1], [1, 1], [1]]

Another great advantage of growth diagrams is that we immediately have access to a skew version of the correspondence, by providing different initialization for the labels on the side of the origin. We reproduce the original example of Bruce Sagan and Richard Stanley, see also Tom Roby’s thesis [Rob1991]:

sage: w = {(1-1,4-1): 1, (2-1,2-1): 1, (4-1,3-1): 1}
sage: T = SkewTableau([[None, None], [None, 5], [1]])
sage: U = SkewTableau([[None, None], [None, 3], [5]])
sage: labels = T.to_chain()[::-1] + U.to_chain()[1:]
sage: G = GrowthDiagram(RuleRSK, filling=w, shape=[5,5,5,5,5], labels=labels); G
0  0  0  0  0
0  1  0  0  0
0  0  0  1  0
1  0  0  0  0
0  0  0  0  0
sage: ascii_art([G.P_symbol(), G.Q_symbol()])
[   .  .  2  3    .  .  1  4 ]
[   .  .          .  .       ]
[   .  4          .  2       ]
[   1             3          ]
[   5         ,   5          ]

Similarly, there is a correspondence for skew oscillating tableau. Let us conclude by reproducing Example 4.2.6 from [Rob1991]. The oscillating tableau, as given, is:

sage: o = [[2,1],[2,2],[3,2],[4,2],[4,1],[4,1,1],[3,1,1],[3,1],[3,2],[3,1],[2,1]]

From this, we have to construct the list of labels of the corners along the bottom-right boundary. The labels with odd indices are given by the oscillating tableau, the other labels are obtained by taking the smaller of the two neighbouring partitions:

sage: l = [o[i//2] if is_even(i) else min(o[(i-1)//2],o[(i+1)//2])
....:      for i in range(2*len(o)-1)]
sage: la = list(range(len(o)-2, 0, -1))
sage: G = RuleRSK(labels=l[1:-1], shape=la); G
0  0  0  0  0  0  0  1  0
0  1  0  0  0  0  0  0
0  0  0  0  0  0  0
0  0  0  0  0  0
0  0  1  0  0
0  0  0  0
0  0  0
0  0
0

The skew tableaux can now be read off the partitions labelling the left and the top boundary. These can be accessed using the method in_labels():

sage: ascii_art(SkewTableau(chain=G.in_labels()[len(o)-2:]),
....:           SkewTableau(chain=G.in_labels()[len(o)-2::-1]))
.  1  .  7
5     4

Rules currently available

As mentioned at the beginning, the Robinson-Schensted-Knuth correspondence is just a special case of growth diagrams. In particular, we have implemented the following local rules:

  • RSK (RuleRSK).
  • A variation of RSK originally due to Burge (RuleBurge).
  • A correspondence producing binary words originally due to Viennot (RuleBinaryWord).
  • A correspondence producing domino tableaux (RuleDomino) originally due to Barbasch and Vogan.
  • A correspondence for shifted shapes (RuleShiftedShapes), where the original insertion algorithm is due to Sagan and Worley, and Haiman.
  • The Sylvester correspondence, producing binary trees (RuleSylvester).
  • The Young-Fibonacci correspondence (RuleYoungFibonacci).
  • LLMS insertion (RuleLLMS).

Background

At the heart of Fomin’s framework is the notion of dual graded graphs. This is a pair of digraphs \(P, Q\) (multiple edges being allowed) on the same set of vertices \(V\), that satisfy the following conditions:

  • the graphs are graded, that is, there is a function \(\rho : V \to \NN\), such that for any edge \((v, w)\) of \(P\) and also of \(Q\) we have \(\rho(w) = \rho(v) + 1\),
  • there is a vertex \(0\) with rank zero, and
  • there is a positive integer \(r\) such that \(DU = UD + rI\) on the free \(\ZZ\)-module \(\ZZ[V]\), where \(D\) is the down operator of \(Q\), assigning to each vertex the formal sum of its predecessors, \(U\) is the up operator of \(P\), assigning to each vertex the formal sum of its successors, and \(I\) is the identity operator.

Note that the condition \(DU = UD + rI\) is symmetric with respect to the interchange of the graphs \(P\) and \(Q\), because the up operator of a graph is the transpose of its down operator.

For example, taking for both \(P\) and \(Q\) to be Young’s lattice and \(r=1\), we obtain the dual graded graphs for classical Schensted insertion.

Given such a pair of graphs, there is a bijection between the \(r\)-colored permutations on \(k\) letters and pairs \((p, q)\), where \(p\) is a path in \(P\) from zero to a vertex of rank \(k\) and \(q\) is a path in \(Q\) from zero to the same vertex.

It turns out that - in principle - this bijection can always be described by so-called local forward and backward rules, see [Fom1995] for a detailed description. Knowing at least the forward rules, or the backward rules, you can implement your own growth diagram class.

Implementing your own growth diagrams

The class GrowthDiagram is written so that it is easy to implement growth diagrams you come across in your research. Moreover, the class tolerates some deviations from Fomin’s definitions. For example, although the general Robinson-Schensted-Knuth correspondence between integer matrices and semistandard tableaux is, strictly speaking, not a growth on dual graded graphs, it is supported by our framework.

For illustration, let us implement a growth diagram class with the backward rule only. Suppose that the vertices of the graph are the non-negative integers, the rank is given by the integer itself, and the backward rule is \((y, z, x) \mapsto (\min(x,y), 0)\) if \(y = z\) or \(x = z\) and \((y, z, x) \mapsto (\min(x,y), 1)\) otherwise.

We first need to import the base class for a rule:

sage: from sage.combinat.growth import Rule

Next, we implement the backward rule and the rank function and provide the bottom element zero of the graph. For more information, see Rule.

sage: class RulePascal(Rule):
....:     zero = 0
....:     def rank(self, v): return v
....:     def backward_rule(self, y, z, x):
....:         return (min(x,y), 0 if y==z or x==z else 1)

We can now compute the filling corresponding to a sequence of labels as follows:

sage: GrowthDiagram(RulePascal(), labels=[0,1,2,1,2,1,0])
1  0  0
0  0  1
0  1

Of course, since we have not provided the forward rule, we cannot compute the labels belonging to a filling:

sage: GrowthDiagram(RulePascal(), [3,1,2])
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
AttributeError: 'RulePascal' object has no attribute 'forward_rule'

We now re-implement the rule where we provide the dual graded graphs:

sage: class RulePascal(Rule):
....:     zero = 0
....:     def rank(self, v): return v
....:     def backward_rule(self, y, z, x):
....:         return (min(x,y), 0 if y==z or x==z else 1)
....:     def vertices(self, n): return [n]
....:     def is_P_edge(self, v, w): return w == v + 1
....:     def is_Q_edge(self, v, w): return w == v + 1

Are they really dual?

sage: RulePascal()._check_duality(3)
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
ValueError: D U - U D differs from 1 I for vertex 3:
D U = [3]
U D + 1 I = [3, 3]

With our current definition, duality fails - in fact, there are no dual graded graphs on the integers without multiple edges. Consequently, also the backward rule cannot work as backward_rule requires additional information (the edge labels as arguments).

Let us thus continue with the example from Section 4.7 of [Fom1995] instead, which defines dual graded graphs with multiple edges on the integers. The color self.zero_edge, which defaults to 0 is reserved for degenerate edges, but may be abused for the unique edge if one of the graphs has no multiple edges. For greater clarity in this example we set it to None:

sage: class RulePascal(Rule):
....:     zero = 0
....:     has_multiple_edges = True
....:     zero_edge = None
....:     def rank(self, v): return v
....:     def vertices(self, n): return [n]
....:     def is_P_edge(self, v, w): return [0] if w == v + 1 else []
....:     def is_Q_edge(self, v, w): return list(range(w)) if w == v+1 else []

We verify these are \(1\) dual at level \(5\):

sage: RulePascal()._check_duality(5)

Finally, let us provide the backward rule. The arguments of the rule are vertices together with the edge labels now, specifying the path from the lower left to the upper right of the cell. The horizontal edges come from \(Q\), whereas the vertical edges come from \(P\).

Thus, the definition in Section 4.7 of [Fom1995] translates as follows:

sage: class RulePascal(Rule):
....:     zero = 0
....:     has_multiple_edges = True
....:     zero_edge = None
....:     def rank(self, v): return v
....:     def vertices(self, n): return [n]
....:     def is_P_edge(self, v, w): return [0] if w == v + 1 else []
....:     def is_Q_edge(self, v, w): return list(range(w)) if w == v+1 else []
....:     def backward_rule(self, y, g, z, h, x):
....:         if g is None:
....:             return (0, x, None, 0)
....:         if h is None:
....:             return (None, y, g, 0)
....:         if g == 0:
....:             return (None, y, None, 1)
....:         else:
....:             return (0, x-1, g-1, 0)

The labels are now alternating between vertices and edge-colors:

sage: GrowthDiagram(RulePascal(), labels=[0,0,1,0,2,0,1,0,0])
1  0
0  1

sage: GrowthDiagram(RulePascal(), labels=[0,0,1,1,2,0,1,0,0])
0  1
1  0
class sage.combinat.growth.GrowthDiagram(rule, filling=None, shape=None, labels=None)

Bases: sage.structure.sage_object.SageObject

A generalized Schensted growth diagram in the sense of Fomin.

Growth diagrams were introduced by Sergey Fomin [Fom1994], [Fom1995] and provide a vast generalization of the Robinson-Schensted-Knuth (RSK) correspondence between matrices with non-negative integer entries and pairs of semistandard Young tableaux of the same shape.

A growth diagram is based on the notion of dual graded graphs, a pair of digraphs \(P, Q\) (multiple edges being allowed) on the same set of vertices \(V\), that satisfy the following conditions:

  • the graphs are graded, that is, there is a function \(\rho : V \to \NN\), such that for any edge \((v, w)\) of \(P\) and also of \(Q\) we have \(\rho(w) = \rho(v) + 1\),
  • there is a vertex \(0\) with rank zero, and
  • there is a positive integer \(r\) such that \(DU = UD + rI\) on the free \(\ZZ\)-module \(\ZZ[V]\), where \(D\) is the down operator of \(Q\), assigning to each vertex the formal sum of its predecessors, \(U\) is the up operator of \(P\), assigning to each vertex the formal sum of its successors, and \(I\) is the identity operator.

Growth diagrams are defined by providing a pair of local rules: a ‘forward’ rule, whose input are three vertices \(y\), \(t\) and \(x\) of the dual graded graphs and an integer, and whose output is a fourth vertex \(z\). This rule should be invertible in the following sense: there is a so-called ‘backward’ rule that recovers the integer and \(t\) given \(y\), \(z\) and \(x\).

All implemented growth diagram rules are available by GrowthDiagram.rules.<tab>. The current list is:

  • RuleRSK – RSK
  • RuleBurge – a variation of RSK originally due to Burge
  • RuleBinaryWord – a correspondence producing binary words originally due to Viennot
  • RuleDomino – a correspondence producing domino tableaux originally due to Barbasch and Vogan
  • RuleShiftedShapes – a correspondence for shifted shapes, where the original insertion algorithm is due to Sagan and Worley, and Haiman.
  • RuleSylvester – the Sylvester correspondence, producing binary trees
  • RuleYoungFibonacci – the Young-Fibonacci correspondence
  • RuleLLMS – LLMS insertion

INPUT:

  • ruleRule; the growth diagram rule
  • filling – (optional) a dictionary whose keys are coordinates and values are integers, a list of lists of integers, or a word with integer values; if a word, then negative letters but without repetitions are allowed and interpreted as coloured permutations
  • shape – (optional) a (possibly skew) partition
  • labels – (optional) a list that specifies a path whose length in the half-perimeter of the shape; more details given below

If filling is not given, then the growth diagram is determined by applying the backward rule to labels decorating the boundary opposite of the origin of the shape. In this case, labels are interpreted as labelling the boundary opposite of the origin.

Otherwise, shape is inferred from filling or labels if possible and labels is set to rule.zero if not specified. Here, labels are labelling the boundary on the side of the origin.

For labels, if rule.has_multiple_edges is True, then the elements should be of the form \((v_1, e_1, \ldots, e_{n-1}, v_n)\), where \(n\) is the half-perimeter of shape, and \((v_{i-1}, e_i, v_i)\) is an edge in the dual graded graph for all \(i\). Otherwise, it is a list of \(n\) vertices.

Note

Coordinates are of the form (col, row) where the origin is in the upper left, to be consistent with permutation matrices and skew tableaux (in English convention). This is different from Fomin’s convention, who uses a Cartesian coordinate system.

Conventions are chosen such that for permutations, the same growth diagram is constructed when passing the permutation matrix instead.

EXAMPLES:

We create a growth diagram using the forward RSK rule and a permutation:

sage: RuleRSK = GrowthDiagram.rules.RSK()
sage: pi = Permutation([4, 1, 2, 3])
sage: G = GrowthDiagram(RuleRSK, pi); G
0  1  0  0
0  0  1  0
0  0  0  1
1  0  0  0
sage: G.out_labels()
[[], [1], [1, 1], [2, 1], [3, 1], [3], [2], [1], []]

Passing the permutation matrix instead gives the same result:

sage: G = GrowthDiagram(RuleRSK, pi.to_matrix())
sage: ascii_art([G.P_symbol(), G.Q_symbol()])
[   1  2  3    1  3  4 ]
[   4      ,   2       ]

We give the same example but using a skew shape:

sage: shape = SkewPartition([[4,4,4,2],[1,1]])
sage: G = GrowthDiagram(RuleRSK, pi, shape=shape); G
.  1  0  0
.  0  1  0
0  0  0  1
1  0
sage: G.out_labels()
[[], [1], [1, 1], [1], [2], [3], [2], [1], []]

We construct a growth diagram using the backwards RSK rule by specifying the labels:

sage: GrowthDiagram(RuleRSK, labels=G.out_labels())
0  1  0  0
0  0  1  0
0  0  0  1
1  0
P_chain()

Return the labels along the vertical boundary of a rectangular growth diagram.

EXAMPLES:

sage: BinaryWord = GrowthDiagram.rules.BinaryWord()
sage: G = GrowthDiagram(BinaryWord, [4, 1, 2, 3])
sage: G.P_chain()
[word: , word: 1, word: 11, word: 111, word: 1011]
P_symbol()

Return the labels along the vertical boundary of a rectangular growth diagram as a generalized standard tableau.

EXAMPLES:

sage: RuleRSK = GrowthDiagram.rules.RSK()
sage: G = GrowthDiagram(RuleRSK, [[0,1,0], [1,0,2]])
sage: ascii_art([G.P_symbol(), G.Q_symbol()])
[   1  2  2    1  3  3 ]
[   2      ,   2       ]
Q_chain()

Return the labels along the horizontal boundary of a rectangular growth diagram.

EXAMPLES:

sage: BinaryWord = GrowthDiagram.rules.BinaryWord()
sage: G = GrowthDiagram(BinaryWord, [[0,1,0,0], [0,0,1,0], [0,0,0,1], [1,0,0,0]])
sage: G.Q_chain()
[word: , word: 1, word: 10, word: 101, word: 1011]
Q_symbol()

Return the labels along the horizontal boundary of a rectangular growth diagram as a generalized standard tableau.

EXAMPLES:

sage: RuleRSK = GrowthDiagram.rules.RSK()
sage: G = GrowthDiagram(RuleRSK, [[0,1,0], [1,0,2]])
sage: ascii_art([G.P_symbol(), G.Q_symbol()])
[   1  2  2    1  3  3 ]
[   2      ,   2       ]
conjugate()

Return the conjugate growth diagram of self. This is the growth diagram with the filling reflected over the main diagonal.

The sequence of labels along the boundary on the side of the origin is the reversal of the corresponding sequence of the original growth diagram.

When the filling is a permutation, the conjugate filling corresponds to its inverse.

EXAMPLES:

sage: RuleRSK = GrowthDiagram.rules.RSK()
sage: G = GrowthDiagram(RuleRSK, [[0,1,0], [1,0,2]])
sage: Gc = G.conjugate()
sage: (Gc.P_symbol(), Gc.Q_symbol()) == (G.Q_symbol(), G.P_symbol())
True
filling()

Return the filling of the diagram as a dictionary.

EXAMPLES:

sage: RuleRSK = GrowthDiagram.rules.RSK()
sage: G = GrowthDiagram(RuleRSK, [[0,1,0], [1,0,2]])
sage: G.filling()
{(0, 1): 1, (1, 0): 1, (2, 1): 2}
half_perimeter()

Return half the perimeter of the shape of the growth diagram.

in_labels()

Return the labels along the boundary on the side of the origin.

EXAMPLES:

sage: RuleRSK = GrowthDiagram.rules.RSK()
sage: G = GrowthDiagram(RuleRSK, labels=[[2,2],[3,2],[3,3],[3,2]]); G
1 0
sage: G.in_labels()
[[2, 2], [2, 2], [2, 2], [3, 2]]
is_rectangular()

Return True if the shape of the growth diagram is rectangular.

EXAMPLES:

sage: RuleRSK = GrowthDiagram.rules.RSK()
sage: GrowthDiagram(RuleRSK, [2,3,1]).is_rectangular()
True
sage: GrowthDiagram(RuleRSK, [[1,0,1],[0,1]]).is_rectangular()
False
out_labels()

Return the labels along the boundary opposite of the origin.

EXAMPLES:

sage: RuleRSK = GrowthDiagram.rules.RSK()
sage: G = GrowthDiagram(RuleRSK, [[0,1,0], [1,0,2]])
sage: G.out_labels()
[[], [1], [1, 1], [3, 1], [1], []]
rotate()

Return the growth diagram with the filling rotated by 180 degrees.

The rotated growth diagram is initialized with labels=None, that is, all labels along the boundary on the side of the origin are set to rule.zero.

For RSK-growth diagrams and rectangular fillings, this corresponds to evacuation of the \(P\)- and the \(Q\)-symbol.

EXAMPLES:

sage: RuleRSK = GrowthDiagram.rules.RSK()
sage: G = GrowthDiagram(RuleRSK, [[0,1,0], [1,0,2]])
sage: Gc = G.rotate()
sage: ascii_art([Gc.P_symbol(), Gc.Q_symbol()])
[   1  1  1    1  1  2 ]
[   2      ,   3       ]

sage: ascii_art([Tableau(t).evacuation()
....:            for t in [G.P_symbol(), G.Q_symbol()]])
[   1  1  1    1  1  2 ]
[   2      ,   3       ]
rules

alias of Rules

shape()

Return the shape of the growth diagram as a skew partition.

Warning

In the literature the label on the corner opposite of the origin of a rectangular filling is often called the shape of the filling. This method returns the shape of the region instead.

EXAMPLES:

sage: RuleRSK = GrowthDiagram.rules.RSK()
sage: GrowthDiagram(RuleRSK, [1]).shape()
[1] / []
to_biword()

Return the filling as a biword, if the shape is rectangular.

EXAMPLES:

sage: RuleRSK = GrowthDiagram.rules.RSK()
sage: P = Tableau([[1,2,2],[2]])
sage: Q = Tableau([[1,3,3],[2]])
sage: bw = RSK_inverse(P, Q); bw
[[1, 2, 3, 3], [2, 1, 2, 2]]
sage: G = GrowthDiagram(RuleRSK, labels=Q.to_chain()[:-1]+P.to_chain()[::-1]); G
0  1  0
1  0  2

sage: P = SemistandardTableau([[1, 1, 2], [2]])
sage: Q = SemistandardTableau([[1, 2, 2], [2]])
sage: G = GrowthDiagram(RuleRSK, labels=Q.to_chain()[:-1]+P.to_chain()[::-1]); G
0  2
1  1
sage: G.to_biword()
([1, 2, 2, 2], [2, 1, 1, 2])
sage: RSK([1, 2, 2, 2], [2, 1, 1, 2])
[[[1, 1, 2], [2]], [[1, 2, 2], [2]]]
to_word()

Return the filling as a word, if the shape is rectangular and there is at most one nonzero entry in each column, which must be 1.

EXAMPLES:

sage: RuleRSK = GrowthDiagram.rules.RSK()
sage: w = [3,3,2,4,1]; G = GrowthDiagram(RuleRSK, w)
sage: G
0  0  0  0  1
0  0  1  0  0
1  1  0  0  0
0  0  0  1  0
sage: G.to_word()
[3, 3, 2, 4, 1]
sage.combinat.growth.GrowthDiagramBinWord(filling=None, shape=None, labels=None)

GrowthDiagramBinWord is deprecated; use GrowthDiagram.rules.BinaryWord instead.

EXAMPLES:

sage: GrowthDiagram.rules.BinaryWord()([4,1,3,2]).P_chain()
[word: , word: 1, word: 11, word: 110, word: 1010]
sage.combinat.growth.GrowthDiagramBurge(filling=None, shape=None, labels=None)

GrowthDiagramBurge is deprecated; use GrowthDiagram.rules.Burge instead.

EXAMPLES:

sage: GrowthDiagram.rules.Burge()([4,1,3,1,2]).P_symbol()
[[1, 2], [1, 3], [4]]
sage.combinat.growth.GrowthDiagramDomino(filling=None, shape=None, labels=None)

GrowthDiagramDomino is deprecated; use GrowthDiagram.rules.Domino instead.

EXAMPLES:

sage: GrowthDiagram.rules.Domino()([4,1,3,2]).P_symbol()
[[1, 1, 2, 2], [3, 3], [4, 4]]
sage.combinat.growth.GrowthDiagramRSK(filling=None, shape=None, labels=None)

GrowthDiagramRSK is deprecated; use GrowthDiagram.rules.RSK instead.

EXAMPLES:

sage: GrowthDiagram.rules.RSK()([4,1,3,1,2]).P_symbol()
[[1, 1, 2], [3], [4]]
sage.combinat.growth.GrowthDiagramSylvester(filling=None, shape=None, labels=None)

GrowthDiagramSylvester is deprecated; use GrowthDiagram.rules.Sylvester instead.

EXAMPLES:

sage: GrowthDiagram.rules.Sylvester()([4,1,3,2]).P_chain()
[., [., .], [., [., .]], [., [[., .], .]], [[., [[., .], .]], .]]
sage.combinat.growth.GrowthDiagramYoungFibonacci(filling=None, shape=None, labels=None)

GrowthDiagramYoungFibonacci is deprecated; use GrowthDiagram.rules.YoungFibonacci instead.

EXAMPLES:

sage: GrowthDiagram.rules.YoungFibonacci()([4,1,3,2]).P_chain()
[word: , word: 1, word: 11, word: 21, word: 211]
class sage.combinat.growth.Rule

Bases: sage.structure.unique_representation.UniqueRepresentation

Generic base class for a rule for a growth diagram.

Subclasses may provide the following attributes:

  • zero – the zero element of the vertices of the graphs
  • r – (default: 1) the parameter in the equation \(DU - UD = rI\)
  • has_multiple_edges – (default: False) if the dual graded graph has multiple edges and therefore edges are triples consisting of two vertices and a label.
  • zero_edge – (default: 0) the zero label of the edges of the graphs used for degenerate edges. It is allowed to use this label also for other edges.

Subclasses may provide the following methods:

  • normalize_vertex – a function that converts its input to a vertex.
  • vertices – a function that takes a non-negative integer as input and returns the list of vertices on this rank.
  • rank – the rank function of the dual graded graphs.
  • forward_rule – a function with input (y, t, x, content) or (y, e, t, f, x, content) if has_multiple_edges is True. (y, e, t) is an edge in the graph \(P\), (t, f, x) an edge in the graph Q. It should return the fourth vertex z, or, if has_multiple_edges is True, the path (g, z, h) from y to x.
  • backward_rule – a function with input (y, z, x) or (y, g, z, h, x) if has_multiple_edges is True. (y, g, z) is an edge in the graph \(Q\), (z, h, x) an edge in the graph P. It should return the fourth vertex and the content (t, content), or, if has_multiple_edges is True, the path from y to x and the content as (e, t, f, content).
  • is_P_edge, is_Q_edge – functions that take two vertices as arguments and return True or False, or, if multiple edges are allowed, the list of edge labels of the edges from the first vertex to the second in the respective graded graph. These are only used for checking user input and providing the dual graded graph, and are therefore not mandatory.

Note that the class GrowthDiagram is able to use partially implemented subclasses just fine. Suppose that MyRule is such a subclass. Then:

  • GrowthDiagram(MyRule, my_filling) requires only an implementation of forward_rule, zero and possibly has_multiple_edges.
  • GrowthDiagram(MyRule, labels=my_labels, shape=my_shape) requires only an implementation of backward_rule and possibly has_multiple_edges, provided that the labels my_labels are given as needed by backward_rule.
  • GrowthDiagram(MyRule, labels=my_labels) additionally needs an implementation of rank to deduce the shape.

In particular, this allows to implement rules which do not quite fit Fomin’s notion of dual graded graphs. An example would be Bloom and Saracino’s variant of the RSK correspondence [BS2012], where a backward rule is not available.

Similarly:

  • MyRule.P_graph only requires an implementation of vertices, is_P_edge and possibly has_multiple_edges is required, mutatis mutandis for MyRule.Q_graph.
  • MyRule._check_duality requires P_graph and Q_graph.

In particular, this allows to work with dual graded graphs without local rules.

P_graph(n)

Return the first n levels of the first dual graded graph.

The non-degenerate edges in the vertical direction come from this graph.

EXAMPLES:

sage: Domino = GrowthDiagram.rules.Domino()
sage: Domino.P_graph(3)
Finite poset containing 8 elements
Q_graph(n)

Return the first n levels of the second dual graded graph.

The non-degenerate edges in the horizontal direction come from this graph.

EXAMPLES:

sage: Domino = GrowthDiagram.rules.Domino()
sage: Q = Domino.Q_graph(3); Q
Finite poset containing 8 elements

sage: Q.upper_covers(Partition([1,1]))
[[1, 1, 1, 1], [3, 1], [2, 2]]
normalize_vertex(v)

Return v as a vertex of the dual graded graph.

This is a default implementation, returning its argument.

EXAMPLES:

sage: from sage.combinat.growth import Rule
sage: Rule().normalize_vertex("hello") is "hello"
True
class sage.combinat.growth.RuleBinaryWord

Bases: sage.combinat.growth.Rule

A rule modelling a Schensted-like correspondence for binary words.

EXAMPLES:

sage: BinaryWord = GrowthDiagram.rules.BinaryWord()
sage: GrowthDiagram(BinaryWord, [3,1,2])
0  1  0
0  0  1
1  0  0

The vertices of the dual graded graph are binary words:

sage: BinaryWord.vertices(3)
[word: 100, word: 101, word: 110, word: 111]

Note that, instead of passing the rule to GrowthDiagram, we can also use call the rule to create growth diagrams. For example:

sage: BinaryWord([2,4,1,3]).P_chain()
[word: , word: 1, word: 10, word: 101, word: 1101]
sage: BinaryWord([2,4,1,3]).Q_chain()
[word: , word: 1, word: 11, word: 110, word: 1101]

The Kleitman Greene invariant is the descent word, encoded by the positions of the zeros:

sage: pi = Permutation([4,1,8,3,6,5,2,7,9])
sage: G = BinaryWord(pi); G
0  1  0  0  0  0  0  0  0
0  0  0  0  0  0  1  0  0
0  0  0  1  0  0  0  0  0
1  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0
0  0  0  0  0  1  0  0  0
0  0  0  0  1  0  0  0  0
0  0  0  0  0  0  0  1  0
0  0  1  0  0  0  0  0  0
0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  1
sage: pi.descents(from_zero=False)
[1, 3, 5, 6]
backward_rule(y, z, x)

Return the content and the input shape.

See [Fom1995] Lemma 4.6.1, page 40.

  • y, z, x – three binary words from a cell in a growth diagram, labelled as:

      x
    y z
    

OUTPUT:

A pair (t, content) consisting of the shape of the fourth word and the content of the cell according to Viennot’s bijection [Vie1983].

forward_rule(y, t, x, content)

Return the output shape given three shapes and the content.

See [Fom1995] Lemma 4.6.1, page 40.

INPUT:

  • y, t, x – three binary words from a cell in a growth diagram, labelled as:

    t x
    y
    
  • content\(0\) or \(1\); the content of the cell

OUTPUT:

The fourth binary word z according to Viennot’s bijection [Vie1983].

EXAMPLES:

sage: BinaryWord = GrowthDiagram.rules.BinaryWord()

sage: BinaryWord.forward_rule([], [], [], 1)
word: 1

sage: BinaryWord.forward_rule([1], [1], [1], 1)
word: 11

if x != y append last letter of x to y:

sage: BinaryWord.forward_rule([1,0], [1], [1,1], 0)
word: 101

if x == y != t append 0 to y:

sage: BinaryWord.forward_rule([1,1], [1], [1,1], 0)
word: 110
is_P_edge(v, w)

Return whether (v, w) is a \(P\)-edge of self.

(v, w) is an edge if v is obtained from w by deleting a letter.

EXAMPLES:

sage: BinaryWord = GrowthDiagram.rules.BinaryWord()
sage: v = BinaryWord.vertices(2)[1]; v
word: 11
sage: [w for w in BinaryWord.vertices(3) if BinaryWord.is_P_edge(v, w)]
[word: 101, word: 110, word: 111]
sage: [w for w in BinaryWord.vertices(4) if BinaryWord.is_P_edge(v, w)]
[]
is_Q_edge(v, w)

Return whether (v, w) is a \(Q\)-edge of self.

(w, v) is an edge if w is obtained from v by appending a letter.

EXAMPLES:

sage: BinaryWord = GrowthDiagram.rules.BinaryWord()
sage: v = BinaryWord.vertices(2)[0]; v
word: 10
sage: [w for w in BinaryWord.vertices(3) if BinaryWord.is_Q_edge(v, w)]
[word: 100, word: 101]
sage: [w for w in BinaryWord.vertices(4) if BinaryWord.is_Q_edge(v, w)]
[]
normalize_vertex(v)

Return v as a binary word.

EXAMPLES:

sage: BinaryWord = GrowthDiagram.rules.BinaryWord()
sage: BinaryWord.normalize_vertex([0,1]).parent()
Finite words over {0, 1}
rank(v)

Return the rank of v: number of letters of the word.

EXAMPLES:

sage: BinaryWord = GrowthDiagram.rules.BinaryWord()
sage: BinaryWord.rank(BinaryWord.vertices(3)[0])
3
vertices(n)

Return the vertices of the dual graded graph on level n.

EXAMPLES:

sage: BinaryWord = GrowthDiagram.rules.BinaryWord()
sage: BinaryWord.vertices(3)
[word: 100, word: 101, word: 110, word: 111]
class sage.combinat.growth.RuleBurge

Bases: sage.combinat.growth.RulePartitions

A rule modelling Burge insertion.

EXAMPLES:

sage: Burge = GrowthDiagram.rules.Burge()
sage: GrowthDiagram(Burge, labels=[[],[1,1,1],[2,1,1,1],[2,1,1],[2,1],[1,1],[]])
1  1
0  1
1  0
1  0

The vertices of the dual graded graph are integer partitions:

sage: Burge.vertices(3)
Partitions of the integer 3

The local rules implemented provide Burge’s correspondence between matrices with non-negative integer entries and pairs of semistandard tableaux, the P_symbol() and the Q_symbol(). For permutations, it reduces to classical Schensted insertion.

Instead of passing the rule to GrowthDiagram, we can also call the rule to create growth diagrams. For example:

sage: m = matrix([[2,0,0,1,0],[1,1,0,0,0], [0,0,0,0,3]])
sage: G = Burge(m); G
2  0  0  1  0
1  1  0  0  0
0  0  0  0  3

sage: ascii_art([G.P_symbol(), G.Q_symbol()])
[   1  2  3    1  2  5 ]
[   1  3       1  5    ]
[   1  3       1  5    ]
[   2      ,   4       ]

For rectangular fillings, the Kleitman-Greene invariant is the shape of the P_symbol(). Put differently, it is the partition labelling the lower right corner of the filling (recall that we are using matrix coordinates). It can be computed alternatively as the transpose of the partition \((\mu_1, \ldots, \mu_n)\), where \(\mu_1 + \cdots + \mu_i\) is the maximal sum of entries in a collection of \(i\) pairwise disjoint sequences of cells with weakly decreasing row indices and weakly increasing column indices.

backward_rule(y, z, x)

Return the content and the input shape.

See [Kra2006] \((B^4 0)-(B^4 2)\). (In the arXiv version of the article there is a typo: in the computation of carry in \((B^4 2)\) , \(\rho\) must be replaced by \(\lambda\)).

INPUT:

  • y, z, x – three partitions from a cell in a growth diagram, labelled as:

      x
    y z
    

OUTPUT:

A pair (t, content) consisting of the shape of the fourth partition according to the Burge correspondence and the content of the cell.

EXAMPLES:

sage: Burge = GrowthDiagram.rules.Burge()
sage: Burge.backward_rule([1,1,1],[2,1,1,1],[2,1,1])
([1, 1], 0)
forward_rule(y, t, x, content)

Return the output shape given three shapes and the content.

See [Kra2006] \((F^4 0)-(F^4 2)\).

INPUT:

  • y, t, x – three from a cell in a growth diagram, labelled as:

    t x
    y
    
  • content – a non-negative integer; the content of the cell

OUTPUT:

The fourth partition according to the Burge correspondence.

EXAMPLES:

sage: Burge = GrowthDiagram.rules.Burge()
sage: Burge.forward_rule([2,1],[2,1],[2,1],1)
[3, 1]

sage: Burge.forward_rule([1],[],[2],2)
[2, 1, 1, 1]
class sage.combinat.growth.RuleDomino

Bases: sage.combinat.growth.Rule

A rule modelling domino insertion.

EXAMPLES:

sage: Domino = GrowthDiagram.rules.Domino()
sage: GrowthDiagram(Domino, [[1,0,0],[0,0,1],[0,-1,0]])
1  0  0
0  0  1
0 -1  0

The vertices of the dual graded graph are integer partitions whose Ferrers diagram can be tiled with dominoes:

sage: Domino.vertices(2)
[[4], [3, 1], [2, 2], [2, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1, 1]]

Instead of passing the rule to GrowthDiagram, we can also call the rule to create growth diagrams. For example, let us check Figure 3 in [Lam2004]:

sage: G = Domino([[0,0,0,-1],[0,0,1,0],[-1,0,0,0],[0,1,0,0]]); G
 0  0  0 -1
 0  0  1  0
-1  0  0  0
 0  1  0  0

sage: ascii_art([G.P_symbol(), G.Q_symbol()])
[   1  2  4    1  2  2 ]
[   1  2  4    1  3  3 ]
[   3  3   ,   4  4    ]

The spin of a domino tableau is half the number of vertical dominoes:

sage: def spin(T):
....:     return sum(2*len(set(row)) - len(row) for row in T)/4

According to [Lam2004], the number of negative entries in the signed permutation equals the sum of the spins of the two associated tableaux:

sage: pi = [3,-1,2,4,-5]
sage: G = Domino(pi)
sage: G.filling().values().count(-1) == spin(G.P_symbol()) + spin(G.Q_symbol())
True

Negating all signs transposes all the partitions:

sage: G.P_symbol() == Domino([-e for e in pi]).P_symbol().conjugate()
True
P_symbol(P_chain)

Return the labels along the vertical boundary of a rectangular growth diagram as a (skew) domino tableau.

EXAMPLES:

sage: Domino = GrowthDiagram.rules.Domino()
sage: G = Domino([[0,1,0],[0,0,-1],[1,0,0]])
sage: G.P_symbol().pp()
1  1
2  3
2  3
Q_symbol(P_chain)

Return the labels along the vertical boundary of a rectangular growth diagram as a (skew) domino tableau.

EXAMPLES:

sage: Domino = GrowthDiagram.rules.Domino()
sage: G = Domino([[0,1,0],[0,0,-1],[1,0,0]])
sage: G.P_symbol().pp()
1  1
2  3
2  3
forward_rule(y, t, x, content)

Return the output shape given three shapes and the content.

See [Lam2004] Section 3.1.

INPUT:

  • y, t, x – three partitions from a cell in a growth diagram, labelled as:

    t x
    y
    
  • content\(-1\), \(0\) or \(1\); the content of the cell

OUTPUT:

The fourth partition according to domino insertion.

EXAMPLES:

sage: Domino = GrowthDiagram.rules.Domino()

Rule 1:

sage: Domino.forward_rule([], [], [], 1)
[2]

sage: Domino.forward_rule([1,1], [1,1], [1,1], 1)
[3, 1]

Rule 2:

sage: Domino.forward_rule([1,1], [1,1], [1,1], -1)
[1, 1, 1, 1]

Rule 3:

sage: Domino.forward_rule([1,1], [1,1], [2,2], 0)
[2, 2]

Rule 4:

sage: Domino.forward_rule([2,2,2], [2,2], [3,3], 0)
[3, 3, 2]

sage: Domino.forward_rule([2], [], [1,1], 0)
[2, 2]

sage: Domino.forward_rule([1,1], [], [2], 0)
[2, 2]

sage: Domino.forward_rule([2], [], [2], 0)
[2, 2]

sage: Domino.forward_rule([4], [2], [4], 0)
[4, 2]

sage: Domino.forward_rule([1,1,1,1], [1,1], [1,1,1,1], 0)
[2, 2, 1, 1]

sage: Domino.forward_rule([2,1,1], [2], [4], 0)
[4, 1, 1]
is_P_edge(v, w)

Return whether (v, w) is a \(P\)-edge of self.

(v, w) is an edge if v is obtained from w by deleting a domino.

EXAMPLES:

sage: Domino = GrowthDiagram.rules.Domino()
sage: v = Domino.vertices(2)[1]; ascii_art(v)
***
*
sage: ascii_art([w for w in Domino.vertices(3) if Domino.is_P_edge(v, w)])
[             *** ]
[             *   ]
[ *****  ***  *   ]
[ *    , ***, *   ]
sage: [w for w in Domino.vertices(4) if Domino.is_P_edge(v, w)]
[]
is_Q_edge(v, w)

Return whether (v, w) is a \(P\)-edge of self.

(v, w) is an edge if v is obtained from w by deleting a domino.

EXAMPLES:

sage: Domino = GrowthDiagram.rules.Domino()
sage: v = Domino.vertices(2)[1]; ascii_art(v)
***
*
sage: ascii_art([w for w in Domino.vertices(3) if Domino.is_P_edge(v, w)])
[             *** ]
[             *   ]
[ *****  ***  *   ]
[ *    , ***, *   ]
sage: [w for w in Domino.vertices(4) if Domino.is_P_edge(v, w)]
[]
normalize_vertex(v)

Return v as a partition.

EXAMPLES:

sage: Domino = GrowthDiagram.rules.Domino()
sage: Domino.normalize_vertex([3,1]).parent()
Partitions
rank(v)

Return the rank of v.

The rank of a vertex is half the size of the partition, which equals the number of dominoes in any filling.

EXAMPLES:

sage: Domino = GrowthDiagram.rules.Domino()
sage: Domino.rank(Domino.vertices(3)[0])
3
vertices(n)

Return the vertices of the dual graded graph on level n.

EXAMPLES:

sage: Domino = GrowthDiagram.rules.Domino()
sage: Domino.vertices(2)
[[4], [3, 1], [2, 2], [2, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1, 1]]
class sage.combinat.growth.RuleLLMS(k)

Bases: sage.combinat.growth.Rule

A rule modelling the Schensted correspondence for affine permutations.

EXAMPLES:

sage: LLMS3 = GrowthDiagram.rules.LLMS(3)
sage: GrowthDiagram(LLMS3, [3,1,2])
0  1  0
0  0  1
1  0  0

The vertices of the dual graded graph are Cores:

sage: LLMS3.vertices(4)
3-Cores of length 4

Let us check example of Figure 1 in [LS2007]. Note that, instead of passing the rule to GrowthDiagram, we can also call the rule to create growth diagrams:

sage: G = LLMS3([4,1,2,6,3,5]); G
0  1  0  0  0  0
0  0  1  0  0  0
0  0  0  0  1  0
1  0  0  0  0  0
0  0  0  0  0  1
0  0  0  1  0  0

The P_symbol() is a StrongTableau:

sage: G.P_symbol().pp()
-1 -2 -3 -5
 3  5
-4 -6
 5
 6

The Q_symbol() is a WeakTableau:

sage: G.Q_symbol().pp()
1  3  4  5
2  5
3  6
5
6

Let us also check Example 6.2 in [LLMSSZ2013]:

sage: G = LLMS3([4,1,3,2])
sage: G.P_symbol().pp()
-1 -2  3
-3
-4

sage: G.Q_symbol().pp()
1  3  4
2
3
P_symbol(P_chain)

Return the labels along the vertical boundary of a rectangular growth diagram as a skew StrongTableau.

EXAMPLES:

sage: LLMS4 = GrowthDiagram.rules.LLMS(4)
sage: G = LLMS4([3,4,1,2])
sage: G.P_symbol().pp()
-1 -2
-3 -4
Q_symbol(Q_chain)

Return the labels along the horizontal boundary of a rectangular growth diagram as a skew WeakTableau.

EXAMPLES:

sage: LLMS4 = GrowthDiagram.rules.LLMS(4)
sage: G = LLMS4([3,4,1,2])
sage: G.Q_symbol().pp()
1 2
3 4
forward_rule(y, e, t, f, x, content)

Return the output path given two incident edges and the content.

See [LS2007] Section 3.4 and [LLMSSZ2013] Section 6.3.

INPUT:

  • y, e, t, f, x – a path of three partitions and two colors from a cell in a growth diagram, labelled as:

    t f x
    e
    y
    
  • content\(0\) or \(1\); the content of the cell

OUTPUT:

The two colors and the fourth partition g, z, h according to LLMS insertion.

EXAMPLES:

sage: LLMS3 = GrowthDiagram.rules.LLMS(3)
sage: LLMS4 = GrowthDiagram.rules.LLMS(4)

sage: Z = LLMS3.zero
sage: LLMS3.forward_rule(Z, None, Z, None, Z, 0)
(None, [], None)

sage: LLMS3.forward_rule(Z, None, Z, None, Z, 1)
(None, [1], 0)

sage: Y = Core([3,1,1], 3);
sage: LLMS3.forward_rule(Y, None, Y, None, Y, 1)
(None, [4, 2, 1, 1], 3)

if x != y:

sage: Y = Core([1,1], 3); T = Core([1], 3); X = Core([2], 3)
sage: LLMS3.forward_rule(Y, -1, T, None, X, 0)
(None, [2, 1, 1], -1)

sage: Y = Core([2], 4); T = Core([1], 4); X = Core([1,1], 4)
sage: LLMS4.forward_rule(Y, 1, T, None, X, 0)
(None, [2, 1], 1)

sage: Y = Core([2,1,1], 3); T = Core([2], 3); X = Core([3,1], 3)
sage: LLMS3.forward_rule(Y, -1, T, None, X, 0)
(None, [3, 1, 1], -2)

if x == y != t:

sage: Y = Core([1], 3); T = Core([], 3); X = Core([1], 3)
sage: LLMS3.forward_rule(Y, 0, T, None, X, 0)
(None, [1, 1], -1)

sage: Y = Core([1], 4); T = Core([], 4); X = Core([1], 4)
sage: LLMS4.forward_rule(Y, 0, T, None, X, 0)
(None, [1, 1], -1)

sage: Y = Core([2,1], 4); T = Core([1,1], 4); X = Core([2,1], 4)
sage: LLMS4.forward_rule(Y, 1, T, None, X, 0)
(None, [2, 2], 0)
is_P_edge(v, w)

Return whether (v, w) is a \(P\)-edge of self.

For two k-cores v and w containing v, there are as many edges as there are components in the skew partition w/v. These components are ribbons, and therefore contain a unique cell with maximal content. We index the edge with this content.

EXAMPLES:

sage: LLMS4 = GrowthDiagram.rules.LLMS(4)
sage: v = LLMS4.vertices(2)[0]; v
[2]
sage: [(w, LLMS4.is_P_edge(v, w)) for w in LLMS4.vertices(3)]
[([3], [2]), ([2, 1], [-1]), ([1, 1, 1], [])]
sage: all(LLMS4.is_P_edge(v, w) == [] for w in LLMS4.vertices(4))
True
is_Q_edge(v, w)

Return whether (v, w) is a \(Q\)-edge of self.

(v, w) is an edge if w is a weak cover of v, see weak_covers().

EXAMPLES:

sage: LLMS4 = GrowthDiagram.rules.LLMS(4)
sage: v = LLMS4.vertices(3)[1]; v
[2, 1]
sage: [w for w in LLMS4.vertices(4) if len(LLMS4.is_Q_edge(v, w)) > 0]
[[2, 2], [3, 1, 1]]
sage: all(LLMS4.is_Q_edge(v, w) == [] for w in LLMS4.vertices(5))
True
normalize_vertex(v)

Convert v to a \(k\)-core.

EXAMPLES:

sage: LLMS3 = GrowthDiagram.rules.LLMS(3)
sage: LLMS3.normalize_vertex([3,1]).parent()
3-Cores of length 3
rank(v)

Return the rank of v: the length of the core.

EXAMPLES:

sage: LLMS3 = GrowthDiagram.rules.LLMS(3)
sage: LLMS3.rank(LLMS3.vertices(3)[0])
3
vertices(n)

Return the vertices of the dual graded graph on level n.

EXAMPLES:

sage: LLMS3 = GrowthDiagram.rules.LLMS(3)
sage: LLMS3.vertices(2)
3-Cores of length 2
class sage.combinat.growth.RulePartitions

Bases: sage.combinat.growth.Rule

A rule for growth diagrams on Young’s lattice on integer partitions graded by size.

P_symbol(P_chain)

Return the labels along the vertical boundary of a rectangular growth diagram as a (skew) tableau.

EXAMPLES:

sage: RuleRSK = GrowthDiagram.rules.RSK()
sage: G = RuleRSK([[0,1,0], [1,0,2]])
sage: G.P_symbol().pp()
1  2  2
2
Q_symbol(Q_chain)

Return the labels along the horizontal boundary of a rectangular growth diagram as a skew tableau.

EXAMPLES:

sage: RuleRSK = GrowthDiagram.rules.RSK()
sage: G = RuleRSK([[0,1,0], [1,0,2]])
sage: G.Q_symbol().pp()
1  3  3
2
normalize_vertex(v)

Return v as a partition.

EXAMPLES:

sage: RSK = GrowthDiagram.rules.RSK()
sage: RSK.normalize_vertex([3,1]).parent()
Partitions
rank(v)

Return the rank of v: the size of the partition.

EXAMPLES:

sage: RSK = GrowthDiagram.rules.RSK()
sage: RSK.rank(RSK.vertices(3)[0])
3
vertices(n)

Return the vertices of the dual graded graph on level n.

EXAMPLES:

sage: RSK = GrowthDiagram.rules.RSK()
sage: RSK.vertices(3)
Partitions of the integer 3
class sage.combinat.growth.RuleRSK

Bases: sage.combinat.growth.RulePartitions

A rule modelling Robinson-Schensted-Knuth insertion.

EXAMPLES:

sage: RuleRSK = GrowthDiagram.rules.RSK()
sage: GrowthDiagram(RuleRSK, [3,2,1,2,3])
0  0  1  0  0
0  1  0  1  0
1  0  0  0  1

The vertices of the dual graded graph are integer partitions:

sage: RuleRSK.vertices(3)
Partitions of the integer 3

The local rules implemented provide the RSK correspondence between matrices with non-negative integer entries and pairs of semistandard tableaux, the P_symbol() and the Q_symbol(). For permutations, it reduces to classical Schensted insertion.

Instead of passing the rule to GrowthDiagram, we can also call the rule to create growth diagrams. For example:

sage: m = matrix([[0,0,0,0,1],[1,1,0,2,0], [0,3,0,0,0]])
sage: G = RuleRSK(m); G
0  0  0  0  1
1  1  0  2  0
0  3  0  0  0

sage: ascii_art([G.P_symbol(), G.Q_symbol()])
[   1  2  2  2  3    1  2  2  2  2 ]
[   2  3             4  4          ]
[   3            ,   5             ]

For rectangular fillings, the Kleitman-Greene invariant is the shape of the P_symbol() (or the Q_symbol()). Put differently, it is the partition labelling the lower right corner of the filling (recall that we are using matrix coordinates). It can be computed alternatively as the partition \((\mu_1,\dots,\mu_n)\), where \(\mu_1 + \dots + \mu_i\) is the maximal sum of entries in a collection of \(i\) pairwise disjoint sequences of cells with weakly increasing coordinates.

For rectangular fillings, we could also use the (faster) implementation provided via RSK(). Because the of the coordinate conventions in RSK(), we have to transpose matrices:

sage: [G.P_symbol(), G.Q_symbol()] == RSK(m.transpose())
True

sage: n=5; l=[(pi, RuleRSK(pi)) for pi in Permutations(n)]
sage: all([G.P_symbol(), G.Q_symbol()] == RSK(pi) for pi, G in l)
True

sage: n=5; l=[(w, RuleRSK(w)) for w in Words([1,2,3], 5)]
sage: all([G.P_symbol(), G.Q_symbol()] == RSK(pi) for pi, G in l)
True
backward_rule(y, z, x)

Return the content and the input shape.

See [Kra2006] \((B^1 0)-(B^1 2)\).

INPUT:

  • y, z, x – three partitions from a cell in a growth diagram, labelled as:

      x
    y z
    

OUTPUT:

A pair (t, content) consisting of the shape of the fourth word according to the Robinson-Schensted-Knuth correspondence and the content of the cell.

forward_rule(y, t, x, content)

Return the output shape given three shapes and the content.

See [Kra2006] \((F^1 0)-(F^1 2)\).

INPUT:

  • y, t, x – three partitions from a cell in a growth diagram, labelled as:

    t x
    y
    
  • content – a non-negative integer; the content of the cell

OUTPUT:

The fourth partition according to the Robinson-Schensted-Knuth correspondence.

EXAMPLES:

sage: RuleRSK = GrowthDiagram.rules.RSK()
sage: RuleRSK.forward_rule([2,1],[2,1],[2,1],1)
[3, 1]

sage: RuleRSK.forward_rule([1],[],[2],2)
[4, 1]
class sage.combinat.growth.RuleShiftedShapes

Bases: sage.combinat.growth.Rule

A class modelling the Schensted correspondence for shifted shapes, which agrees with Sagan and Worley’s and Haiman’s insertion algorithms.

EXAMPLES:

sage: Shifted = GrowthDiagram.rules.ShiftedShapes()
sage: GrowthDiagram(Shifted, [3,1,2])
0  1  0
0  0  1
1  0  0

The vertices of the dual graded graph are shifted shapes:

sage: Shifted.vertices(3)
Partitions of the integer 3 satisfying constraints max_slope=-1

Let us check the example just before Corollary 3.2 in [Sag1987]. Note that, instead of passing the rule to GrowthDiagram, we can also call the rule to create growth diagrams:

sage: G = Shifted([2,6,5,1,7,4,3])
sage: G.P_chain()
[[], 0, [1], 0, [2], 0, [3], 0, [3, 1], 0, [3, 2], 0, [4, 2], 0, [5, 2]]
sage: G.Q_chain()
[[], 1, [1], 2, [2], 1, [2, 1], 3, [3, 1], 2, [4, 1], 3, [4, 2], 3, [5, 2]]
backward_rule(y, g, z, h, x)

Return the input path and the content given two incident edges.

See [Fom1995] Lemma 4.5.1, page 38.

INPUT:

  • y, g, z, h, x – a path of three partitions and two colors from a cell in a growth diagram, labelled as:

        x
        h
    y g z
    

OUTPUT:

A tuple (e, t, f, content) consisting of the shape t of the fourth word, the colours of the incident edges and the content of the cell according to Sagan - Worley insertion.

EXAMPLES:

sage: Shifted = GrowthDiagram.rules.ShiftedShapes()
sage: Shifted.backward_rule([], 1, [1], 0, [])
(0, [], 0, 1)

sage: Shifted.backward_rule([1], 2, [2], 0, [1])
(0, [1], 0, 1)

if x != y:

sage: Shifted.backward_rule([3], 1, [3, 1], 0, [2,1])
(0, [2], 1, 0)

sage: Shifted.backward_rule([2,1], 2, [3, 1], 0, [3])
(0, [2], 2, 0)

if x == y != t:

sage: Shifted.backward_rule([3], 1, [3, 1], 0, [3])
(0, [2], 2, 0)

sage: Shifted.backward_rule([3,1], 2, [3, 2], 0, [3,1])
(0, [2, 1], 2, 0)

sage: Shifted.backward_rule([2,1], 3, [3, 1], 0, [2,1])
(0, [2], 1, 0)

sage: Shifted.backward_rule([3], 3, [4], 0, [3])
(0, [2], 3, 0)
forward_rule(y, e, t, f, x, content)

Return the output path given two incident edges and the content.

See [Fom1995] Lemma 4.5.1, page 38.

INPUT:

  • y, e, t, f, x – a path of three partitions and two colors from a cell in a growth diagram, labelled as:

    t f x
    e
    y
    
  • content\(0\) or \(1\); the content of the cell

OUTPUT:

The two colors and the fourth partition g, z, h according to Sagan-Worley insertion.

EXAMPLES:

sage: Shifted = GrowthDiagram.rules.ShiftedShapes()
sage: Shifted.forward_rule([], 0, [], 0, [], 1)
(1, [1], 0)

sage: Shifted.forward_rule([1], 0, [1], 0, [1], 1)
(2, [2], 0)

if x != y:

sage: Shifted.forward_rule([3], 0, [2], 1, [2,1], 0)
(1, [3, 1], 0)

sage: Shifted.forward_rule([2,1], 0, [2], 2, [3], 0)
(2, [3, 1], 0)

if x == y != t:

sage: Shifted.forward_rule([3], 0, [2], 2, [3], 0)
(1, [3, 1], 0)

sage: Shifted.forward_rule([3,1], 0, [2,1], 2, [3,1], 0)
(2, [3, 2], 0)

sage: Shifted.forward_rule([2,1], 0, [2], 1, [2,1], 0)
(3, [3, 1], 0)

sage: Shifted.forward_rule([3], 0, [2], 3, [3], 0)
(3, [4], 0)
is_P_edge(v, w)

Return whether (v, w) is a \(P\)-edge of self.

(v, w) is an edge if w contains v.

EXAMPLES:

sage: Shifted = GrowthDiagram.rules.ShiftedShapes()
sage: v = Shifted.vertices(2)[0]; v
[2]
sage: [w for w in Shifted.vertices(3) if Shifted.is_P_edge(v, w)]
[[3], [2, 1]]
is_Q_edge(v, w)

Return whether (v, w) is a \(Q\)-edge of self.

(v, w) is an edge if w is obtained from v by adding a cell. It is a black (color 1) edge, if the cell is on the diagonal, otherwise it can be blue or red (color 2 or 3).

EXAMPLES:

sage: Shifted = GrowthDiagram.rules.ShiftedShapes()
sage: v = Shifted.vertices(2)[0]; v
[2]
sage: [(w, Shifted.is_Q_edge(v, w)) for w in Shifted.vertices(3)]
[([3], [2, 3]), ([2, 1], [1])]
sage: all(Shifted.is_Q_edge(v, w) == [] for w in Shifted.vertices(4))
True
normalize_vertex(v)

Return v as a partition.

EXAMPLES:

sage: Shifted = GrowthDiagram.rules.ShiftedShapes()
sage: Shifted.normalize_vertex([3,1]).parent()
Partitions
rank(v)

Return the rank of v: the size of the shifted partition.

EXAMPLES:

sage: Shifted = GrowthDiagram.rules.ShiftedShapes()
sage: Shifted.rank(Shifted.vertices(3)[0])
3
vertices(n)

Return the vertices of the dual graded graph on level n.

EXAMPLES:

sage: Shifted = GrowthDiagram.rules.ShiftedShapes()
sage: Shifted.vertices(3)
Partitions of the integer 3 satisfying constraints max_slope=-1
class sage.combinat.growth.RuleSylvester

Bases: sage.combinat.growth.Rule

A rule modelling a Schensted-like correspondence for binary trees.

EXAMPLES:

sage: Sylvester = GrowthDiagram.rules.Sylvester()
sage: GrowthDiagram(Sylvester, [3,1,2])
0  1  0
0  0  1
1  0  0

The vertices of the dual graded graph are BinaryTrees:

sage: Sylvester.vertices(3)
Binary trees of size 3

The P_graph() is also known as the bracket tree, the Q_graph() is the lattice of finite order ideals of the infinite binary tree, see Example 2.4.6 in [Fom1994].

For a permutation, the P_symbol() is the binary search tree, the Q_symbol() is the increasing tree corresponding to the inverse permutation. Note that, instead of passing the rule to GrowthDiagram, we can also call the rule to create growth diagrams. From [Nze2007]:

sage: pi = Permutation([3,5,1,4,2,6]); G = Sylvester(pi); G
0  0  1  0  0  0
0  0  0  0  1  0
1  0  0  0  0  0
0  0  0  1  0  0
0  1  0  0  0  0
0  0  0  0  0  1
sage: ascii_art(G.P_symbol())
  __3__
 /     \
1       5
 \     / \
  2   4   6
sage: ascii_art(G.Q_symbol())
  __1__
 /     \
3       2
 \     / \
  5   4   6

sage: all(Sylvester(pi).P_symbol() == pi.binary_search_tree()
....:     for pi in Permutations(5))
True

sage: all(Sylvester(pi).Q_symbol() == pi.inverse().increasing_tree()
....:     for pi in Permutations(5))
True
P_symbol(P_chain)

Return the labels along the vertical boundary of a rectangular growth diagram as a labelled binary tree.

For permutations, this coincides with the binary search tree.

EXAMPLES:

sage: Sylvester = GrowthDiagram.rules.Sylvester()
sage: pi = Permutation([2,4,3,1])
sage: ascii_art(Sylvester(pi).P_symbol())
  _2_
 /   \
1     4
     /
    3
sage: Sylvester(pi).P_symbol() == pi.binary_search_tree()
True

We can also do the skew version:

sage: B = BinaryTree; E = B(); N = B([])
sage: ascii_art(Sylvester([3,2], shape=[3,3,3], labels=[N,N,N,E,E,E,N]).P_symbol())
  __1___
 /      \
None     3
        /
       2
Q_symbol(Q_chain)

Return the labels along the vertical boundary of a rectangular growth diagram as a labelled binary tree.

For permutations, this coincides with the increasing tree.

EXAMPLES:

sage: Sylvester = GrowthDiagram.rules.Sylvester()
sage: pi = Permutation([2,4,3,1])
sage: ascii_art(Sylvester(pi).Q_symbol())
  _1_
 /   \
4     2
     /
    3
sage: Sylvester(pi).Q_symbol() == pi.inverse().increasing_tree()
True

We can also do the skew version:

sage: B = BinaryTree; E = B(); N = B([])
sage: ascii_art(Sylvester([3,2], shape=[3,3,3], labels=[N,N,N,E,E,E,N]).Q_symbol())
  _None_
 /      \
3        1
        /
       2
backward_rule(y, z, x)

Return the output shape given three shapes and the content.

See [Nze2007], page 9.

INPUT:

  • y, z, x – three binary trees from a cell in a growth diagram, labelled as:

      x
    y z
    

OUTPUT:

A pair (t, content) consisting of the shape of the fourth binary tree t and the content of the cell.

EXAMPLES:

sage: Sylvester = GrowthDiagram.rules.Sylvester()
sage: B = BinaryTree; E = B(); N = B([]); L = B([[],None])
sage: R = B([None,[]]); T = B([[],[]])

sage: ascii_art(Sylvester.backward_rule(E, E, E))
( , 0 )
sage: ascii_art(Sylvester.backward_rule(N, N, N))
( o, 0 )
forward_rule(y, t, x, content)

Return the output shape given three shapes and the content.

See [Nze2007], page 9.

INPUT:

  • y, t, x – three binary trees from a cell in a growth diagram, labelled as:

    t x
    y
    
  • content\(0\) or \(1\); the content of the cell

OUTPUT:

The fourth binary tree z.

EXAMPLES:

sage: Sylvester = GrowthDiagram.rules.Sylvester()
sage: B = BinaryTree; E = B(); N = B([]); L = B([[],None])
sage: R = B([None,[]]); T = B([[],[]])

sage: ascii_art(Sylvester.forward_rule(E, E, E, 1))
o
sage: ascii_art(Sylvester.forward_rule(N, N, N, 1))
o
 \
  o
sage: ascii_art(Sylvester.forward_rule(L, L, L, 1))
  o
 / \
o   o
sage: ascii_art(Sylvester.forward_rule(R, R, R, 1))
o
 \
  o
   \
    o

If y != x, obtain z from y adding a node such that deleting the right most gives x:

sage: ascii_art(Sylvester.forward_rule(R, N, L, 0))
  o
 / \
o   o

sage: ascii_art(Sylvester.forward_rule(L, N, R, 0))
  o
 /
o
 \
  o

If y == x != t, obtain z from x by adding a node as left child to the right most node:

sage: ascii_art(Sylvester.forward_rule(N, E, N, 0))
  o
 /
o
sage: ascii_art(Sylvester.forward_rule(T, L, T, 0))
  _o_
 /   \
o     o
     /
    o
sage: ascii_art(Sylvester.forward_rule(L, N, L, 0))
    o
   /
  o
 /
o
sage: ascii_art(Sylvester.forward_rule(R, N, R, 0))
o
 \
  o
 /
o
is_P_edge(v, w)

Return whether (v, w) is a \(P\)-edge of self.

(v, w) is an edge if v is obtained from w by deleting its right-most node.

EXAMPLES:

sage: Sylvester = GrowthDiagram.rules.Sylvester()
sage: v = Sylvester.vertices(2)[1]; ascii_art(v)
  o
 /
o

sage: ascii_art([w for w in Sylvester.vertices(3) if Sylvester.is_P_edge(v, w)])
[   o  ,     o ]
[  / \      /  ]
[ o   o    o   ]
[         /    ]
[        o     ]

sage: [w for w in Sylvester.vertices(4) if Sylvester.is_P_edge(v, w)]
[]
is_Q_edge(v, w)

Return whether (v, w) is a \(Q\)-edge of self.

(v, w) is an edge if v is a sub-tree of w with one node less.

EXAMPLES:

sage: Sylvester = GrowthDiagram.rules.Sylvester()
sage: v = Sylvester.vertices(2)[1]; ascii_art(v)
  o
 /
o
sage: ascii_art([w for w in Sylvester.vertices(3) if Sylvester.is_Q_edge(v, w)])
[   o  ,   o,     o ]
[  / \    /      /  ]
[ o   o  o      o   ]
[         \    /    ]
[          o  o     ]
sage: [w for w in Sylvester.vertices(4) if Sylvester.is_Q_edge(v, w)]
[]
normalize_vertex(v)

Return v as a binary tree.

EXAMPLES:

sage: Sylvester = GrowthDiagram.rules.Sylvester()
sage: Sylvester.normalize_vertex([[],[]]).parent()
Binary trees
rank(v)

Return the rank of v: the number of nodes of the tree.

EXAMPLES:

sage: Sylvester = GrowthDiagram.rules.Sylvester()
sage: Sylvester.rank(Sylvester.vertices(3)[0])
3
vertices(n)

Return the vertices of the dual graded graph on level n.

EXAMPLES:

sage: Sylvester = GrowthDiagram.rules.Sylvester()
sage: Sylvester.vertices(3)
Binary trees of size 3
class sage.combinat.growth.RuleYoungFibonacci

Bases: sage.combinat.growth.Rule

A rule modelling a Schensted-like correspondence for Young-Fibonacci-tableaux.

EXAMPLES:

sage: YF = GrowthDiagram.rules.YoungFibonacci()
sage: GrowthDiagram(YF, [3,1,2])
0  1  0
0  0  1
1  0  0

The vertices of the dual graded graph are Fibonacci words - compositions into parts of size at most two:

sage: YF.vertices(4)
[word: 22, word: 211, word: 121, word: 112, word: 1111]

Note that, instead of passing the rule to GrowthDiagram, we can also use call the rule to create growth diagrams. For example:

sage: G = YF([2, 3, 7, 4, 1, 6, 5]); G
0  0  0  0  1  0  0
1  0  0  0  0  0  0
0  1  0  0  0  0  0
0  0  0  1  0  0  0
0  0  0  0  0  0  1
0  0  0  0  0  1  0
0  0  1  0  0  0  0

The Kleitman Greene invariant is: take the last letter and the largest letter of the permutation and remove them. If they coincide write 1, otherwise write 2:

sage: G.P_chain()[-1]
word: 21211
backward_rule(y, z, x)

Return the content and the input shape.

See [Fom1995] Lemma 4.4.1, page 35.

  • y, z, x – three Fibonacci words from a cell in a growth diagram, labelled as:

      x
    y z
    

OUTPUT:

A pair (t, content) consisting of the shape of the fourth word and the content of the cell.

forward_rule(y, t, x, content)

Return the output shape given three shapes and the content.

See [Fom1995] Lemma 4.4.1, page 35.

INPUT:

  • y, t, x – three Fibonacci words from a cell in a growth diagram, labelled as:

    t x
    y
    
  • content\(0\) or \(1\); the content of the cell

OUTPUT:

The fourth Fibonacci word.

EXAMPLES:

sage: YF = GrowthDiagram.rules.YoungFibonacci()

sage: YF.forward_rule([], [], [], 1)
word: 1

sage: YF.forward_rule([1], [1], [1], 1)
word: 11

sage: YF.forward_rule([1,2], [1], [1,1], 0)
word: 21

sage: YF.forward_rule([1,1], [1], [1,1], 0)
word: 21
is_P_edge(v, w)

Return whether (v, w) is a \(P\)-edge of self.

(v, w) is an edge if v is obtained from w by deleting a 1 or replacing the left-most 2 by a 1.

EXAMPLES:

sage: YF = GrowthDiagram.rules.YoungFibonacci()
sage: v = YF.vertices(5)[5]; v
word: 1121
sage: [w for w in YF.vertices(6) if YF.is_P_edge(v, w)]
[word: 2121, word: 11121]
sage: [w for w in YF.vertices(7) if YF.is_P_edge(v, w)]
[]
is_Q_edge(v, w)

Return whether (v, w) is a \(P\)-edge of self.

(v, w) is an edge if v is obtained from w by deleting a 1 or replacing the left-most 2 by a 1.

EXAMPLES:

sage: YF = GrowthDiagram.rules.YoungFibonacci()
sage: v = YF.vertices(5)[5]; v
word: 1121
sage: [w for w in YF.vertices(6) if YF.is_P_edge(v, w)]
[word: 2121, word: 11121]
sage: [w for w in YF.vertices(7) if YF.is_P_edge(v, w)]
[]
normalize_vertex(v)

Return v as a word with letters 1 and 2.

EXAMPLES:

sage: YF = GrowthDiagram.rules.YoungFibonacci()
sage: YF.normalize_vertex([1,2,1]).parent()
Finite words over {1, 2}
rank(v)

Return the rank of v: the size of the corresponding composition.

EXAMPLES:

sage: YF = GrowthDiagram.rules.YoungFibonacci()
sage: YF.rank(YF.vertices(3)[0])
3
vertices(n)

Return the vertices of the dual graded graph on level n.

EXAMPLES:

sage: YF = GrowthDiagram.rules.YoungFibonacci()
sage: YF.vertices(3)
[word: 21, word: 12, word: 111]
class sage.combinat.growth.Rules

Bases: object

Catalog of rules for growth diagrams.

BinaryWord

alias of RuleBinaryWord

Burge

alias of RuleBurge

Domino

alias of RuleDomino

LLMS

alias of RuleLLMS

RSK

alias of RuleRSK

ShiftedShapes

alias of RuleShiftedShapes

Sylvester

alias of RuleSylvester

YoungFibonacci

alias of RuleYoungFibonacci